Humanistic Geography

 Human Geography

TITLE: Renaissance values on culture centres outside Italy”
(click on blue text colour above to read the work in full.)

AUTHOR:   Mavarine Du-Marie

DATE:   3rd May 2008

CITATION:

“The cultural movement within Europe, with regards to the values of the Renaissance, I think, happened very gradually, and by channels of communication which were utilised to transmit the Renaissance concepts readily but, outside Italy, the impact was a process of assimilation rather than a totality of emulation, and these became, in turn, the cultural centres of the Renaissance.

In terms of an enquiry, I will illustrate how the cultural centres was developed by analysing two countries: Poland and the Netherlands, with regards to their significant reception to the Renaissance period, to demonstrate the scope of their relations…”

As these maps illustrate a humanistic geography, which is a term defined as a reflection “…upon geographical phenomena with the ultimate purpose of achieving a better understanding of man and his condition…” (Tan, 1976)

Reference:
Tan, Y., (1976), Humanistic Geography, Annals of the Associations of American Geographers, Vol. 66, pp.266-276.

Related blog postings: Reading Maps
                                     A City’s Materiality
                                     Changing Concepts of Knowledge

Weblink Info: Royal Geographical Society

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