The Education of the Eye by Peter de Bolla

Education of the eye

CITATION:

‘The Education of the Eye’ examines the origins of visual culture in eighteenth century Britain. It claims that at the moment when works of visual art were first displayed and contemplated as aesthetic objects, two competing descriptions of the viewer or spectator promoted two very different accounts of culture. The first was constructed on knowledge, on what one already knew, while the second was grounded in the eye itself. Whereas, the first was most likely to lead to a socially and politically elite form for visual culture, the second, it was held, would almost certainly end up in the chaos of the mob. But there was another route through these conflicting accounts of the visual that preserved the education of the eye while at the same time allowing the eye freedom to enter into the realm of culture. This third route, that of the sentimental look, is explored in a series of contexts: the gallery, the pleasure garden, the landscape park, and the country house. This book sets out to reclaim visual culture for the democracy of the eye and to explain how aesthetic contemplation may, once more, be open to all who have eyes to look…”

Published by Stanford University Press, ISBN: 0-8047-4800-4, published in 2003 as a copyright.

Advertisements

Subscribe To My Podcast

Subscribe to this podcast feed
December 2008
M T W T F S S
    Jan »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

My Image

My Photos

Mavarine Du-Marie

More Photos

Categories

RSS Financial Times newspaper: Management

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

RSS Times newspaper: Law

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

RSS Evening Standard newspaper: Polite society

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

RSS Times Literary Supplement

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

RSS History & The Arts Blog

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Archives

To Bookmark: